Lonnie Lee

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Title History

  • GCW Tag Team titles w/Pegasus defeating The Black Hand & Mike Webster (Late 1976);
  • IWA (Florida) Tag Team titles w/Pegasus defeating Pat & Mike Kelly (Late 1976);
  • NWA SouthEast title defeating The Black Hand (Early 1977);
  • CWA (SD) Junior Heavyweight title defeating “Rock’n’Roll” Buck Zumoff (January 1983);
  • CWA (SD) Tag Team titles w/ Jeff Petitt defeating The Indian Outlaws (March 1983);

 

Career Highlights

  • Late 1976: Lonnie Lee & Pegasus defeated The Black Hand & Mike Webster to win the GCW Tag Team titles..
  • Late 1976: Lonnie Lee & Pegasus defeated “Irish” Pat & Mike Kelly for the IWA Tag Team titles
  • Early 1977: Lonnie Lee defeated The Black Hand to capture the SouthEast title (but was later stripped)..
  • January 1983: Roy Staggs & Lonnie Lee started up Championship Wrestling Associates in Rapid City..
  • ~~~The main goal of the promotion is to bring wrestling shows to the Dakotas, Montana, and Wyoming.
  • January 1983: The Saint defeated “Rock’n’Roll” Buck Zumoff to win the CWA Junior Heavyweight Title..
  • February 19, 1983: The Souix Warrior (Bennie Akecheta) defeated The Saint to win the Jr. Heavyweight title..
  • ~~~The Saint recaptured the Junior Heavyweight title from The Souix Warrior in a rematch held in Rapid City..
  • Lonnie Lee formed a tag team with Jeff Petitt known as “The Saints”..
  • March 1983: The Saints defeated The Indian Outlaws (Souix Warrior/Lakota Joe Chaska) for the CWA Tag Team titles..
  • Lonnie Lee (middleweight), was unable to sustain the added weight, so he makes the transition to becoming a manager..
  • Summer 1983: The Alchemist managed The Convict to the CWA title and The Convict & The Fellon to win the Tag Team titles..
  • July 1993: The Infernos w/Alchemist defeated Bugsy McGraw & Jumping Jack Flash to win the SWF Tag Team titles in St. Pete..
  • Lonnie Lee still referees an occasional bout for local indy shows…

    Lonnie Lee wrote in to share the following comments: I was watching my Niece’s 8 year old daughter and she asked if I was rich, because wrestlers make “lots of money” I told her back when her uncles were screwing around in the ring, very few made “tons of money.” She then asked what the most I made for one match was, so here’s what I told her: When I first started, I made about $300 or $350 per night. I eventually could get around a grand per gig. Roy, before retiring with knee problems could get more, because he had worked most of the big circuits. When we were in South Dakota, I remember it being somewhere around the middle of ’84, wrestling had been on a downturn for some time, this was right before Cyndi Lauper and MTV were about to catapault Hulk/Piper and the WWF into the stratosphere. A promoter that Roy had worked for in the Indy/Chicago areas, sensing things were about to “pop” as he put it, offered Roy $5000 to bring the Hangmen back to face his tag champions (I believe they were called the Wild Men or Wild Warriors). Roy would have to get a partner, which wasn’t a problem–I was still active, but this guy wanted the Hangmen to drop two straight to his guys–and Roy never dropped two straight! So, we decline (Roy said he wouldn’t use the hangmen name, anyway), but make a counter offer. We’ll show up as Pegasus and Lonnie Lee, the undefeated IWF Champs–which was technically true, as we did have the belts when the company folded. It was a lot of fun, the house was filled, and our opponents were big and gnarly. Roy’s knees were completely shot, so he couldn’t do any of the throws and grappling/judo stuff he was noted for, and went straight for the brawling heel routine. After about 20 minutes, I dropped the first fall, when I missed a moon flip off of the top rope. With his legs really aching, we decided to forego the second fall win, and just do a wild finish: we had brought the young lady that ran our telemarketing room with us, as lady Liera. She brought out a red velvet rope from which Roy “hanged” the Wild Men’s manager, before they saved him. And as we battled in the ring , she chased the manager around the ring with the stun gun (the crowd loved it). Of course the match was ruled a “no contest”. It was a lot of fun, for which I got my biggest payday–$2,500, but more importantly, it was the last time I was in the ring with Roy. I miss him.