“Dr. D” David Schultz – an underrated workhorse

Dr D

Being a wrestling aficionado you sometimes find yourself in a rut. Watching virtually the same things over and over. Luckily I’m also raising a 7 and 5 year old future aficionado. This Christmas they were blessed with many new wrestling figures, two of which were Andre The Giant and Terry Gordy which got my wheels turning. Had these two men who I have so much respect for ever plied their trade against one another?

This of course brought me to YouTube for answers. I found several conflicts mostly in Japan and one encounter in Georgia Championship Wrestling but it wasn’t long after I was down the rabbit hole. Eventually a needle in haystack caught my attention. Andre The Giant vs “Dr.D” David Schultz! My eyes widened and out loud gave an inexplicable “Ooooh”. Because I knew I had found a gem. Sure enough it didn’t disappoint.

Now Dr. D might not be a household name to the average wrestling fan. His biggest claim to fame is slapping John Stossel for asking “The Standard Question” which turned out to be the forbidden question in a lot eyes. However, David Schultz is an underrated workhorse in our business’s history.

After I watched his battle with Andre, I went on a Dr.D binge watching him dissect (see what I did there) stars such as Buddy Rose, Nick Bockwinkel, Tommy Rogers, Afa and Hulk Hogan. This is a man that main event from Portland to New York and everywhere in between.

He was a large man but more than that larger than life. He had no problem being the scaredy cat heel to enhance his aggressive babyface. The seamless southern heel that I’ve loved my entire life in embodied in the work of “Dr.D” David Schultz. So next time you feel under the weather when it comes to pro wrestling, seek out David Schultz. He has the medicine to bring you back to life.

— “Golden Boy” Greg Anthony

  • Glen

    Watch some old TNT shows, when they did some segments where they visited his shack, he reminds me of a far more aggressive Stone Cold, with the wifebeater twist, His character would have no chance of being around in today’s WWE in the form it was in 84/85. It’s worth a look. As a wrestler he was never boring, and you could tell he was being himself almost totally.